Programmes in Leicester, UK
Open Evening, Saturdays 7-9 PM
28 Evington Road, LE2 1HG, 07887 560 260

 

Bhakti Workshop, Thursdays 7-9 PM
28 Evington Road, LE2 1HG, 07887 560 260
Dedicated to

prabhupada 12

 

His Divine Grace

A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada

Founder Acarya of the

International Society for

Krishna Consciousness (ISKCON)

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Prasadam distribution in Leicester

Home Vedic Weddings

 

Vedic Wedding (Vivaha-samskara)

 

Devotees at the Hare Krishna Centre conduct Vedic Weddings throughout the UK. All locations are considered. We have experienced priests who are happy to conduct a Vedic Wedding at your venue. Below is an outline of a Vedic Marriage ceremony. Click on the link to view it:

 

Vedic Marriage Ceremony

 

Please contact us to discuss further details and to book a priest for your wedding. You are advised to book early to secure your booking as the best dates are taken quickly even a year ahead. The ceremony will last just under one hour. Our priest will bring with him the yajna kunda and all other necessary paraphernalia and ingredients. All explanations are given in English language. Every step of the cermony will be explained. We guarantee that we will capture your audience and deliver an unforgettable experience for them. A Marriage Certificate can be supplied on request.

 

For payment options (PayPal, Bank Transfer, Cheque) please follow this link.

 

 

Click on the links below for some photos:

 

Fire Yajna and Yajna/Havan Kunda

The Holy Fire

After the Yajna Ceremony

Bride and Bridegroom

During the Ceremony

Bride and Groom in the Yajna

Wedding Vows

Yajna Paraphernalia

 

For Mandaps, Floristry, Event Management, Photography & Videography as well as Lighting & Audio Visuals please click on this link.

 

Last Updated (Friday, 13 July 2012 08:43)

 
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Newsflash

 

Scientists inform us that woodpeckers, who close their eyes during pecking, do so to protect their eyes from popping out. Humans suffer concussion at 80 to 100gs, a woodpeckers head decellerates at 1200 gs, the equivalant of coming to an immediate stop at 26,000 miles per hour. 22 times per second it continually drums the tree and although it spends its whole life drumming away it never suffers brain damage. A hard but elastic beak, an area of spongy bone in its skull and the interaction between the skull and the cerebro spinal fluid to suppress vibration, are the natural mechanisms allowing the impossible to become possible.

 

The European green woodpecker is unique, its tongue is different from any other. Our tongue starts at the back of our throat and comes out of our mouth. The woodpeckers tongue starts at the back of its throat, goes down its throat, comes out at the back of its neck under its skin, up over the top of its head, out between its eyes, out of its nostrils and eventually protrudes from its beak. This unique mechanism gives the woodpecker the ability to protrude its tongue some six inches (150ml) enabling it to reach its grubs. Of course evolutionists are very expert at "explaining away" this phenomenom, though no-one has provided an "adequate" evolutionary explanation.

 

 

Once the woodpecker drills its hole, it has to get its food, the grubs, out. In its mouth it has a little chemical factory which provides glue for the tip of its tongue. The grub sticks to its tongue and when the tongue returns to its mouth other chemicals dissolve the glue enabling it to swallow its meal.

 

Most birds have three toes at the front and one at the back, a woodpecker has two at the front and two at the back. This enables him to climb around a vertical tree trunk right side up, upside down, sideways, it can crawl anyway it wishes. Its tail feathers are also different, resilient, spongy, strong, tough, enabling it to tripod itself with its feet and tail feathers in a perfect stance for drilling its tree.

 

Millions of years ago a normal bird with normal beak, normal tongue, normal feet, normal feathers, no glue factory, apparantly evolved to this miracle of nature we see today, and for what ? To eat grubs? A tongue which evolves around the back of its head and an ability to peck at twice the speed of a machine gun, for what? Just to eat grubs? Many birds exist without drilling holes in trees. There are catterpillars, ants, woodlice and a whole forest of delicious eatables in ample supply, yet woodys not satisfied with this he evolves to become this miraculous machine so he can reach grubs from the back of a tree. Although once again the evolutionists will "explain away" its pretty obvious this is yet another example of "Darwins fairy tales".  

 

"I do not wish to believe in God, therefore I choose to believe in that which I know to be scientifically impossible, spontaneous generation leading to evolution." (Nobel prize winner George Wald)

 

"The scientist is possessed by the sense of universal causation ... His religious feeling takes the form of a rapturous amazement at the harmony of natural law, which reveals an intelligence of such superiority that, compared with it, all the systematic thinking and acting of human beings is an utterly insignificant reflection." (Albert Einstein)

 

"Posterity will one day laugh at the foolishness of modern materialistic philosophers. The more I study nature, the more I stand amazed at the work of the Creator." (Louis Pasteur)

 

Anyone wishing to comment, please scroll down to the bottom and submit your comment. For more information on this subject theres a nice presentation by exploration films.com. Simply click on the following URL and watch the 5 minute youtube video.

 

http://youtu.be/vKR9vS4df-I